Commentary from Interact: May as Well Tell You Now: A Poem

Continued Commentary from Interact with Me: 2) I discuss the comments I picked about  Treyvon Martin

To return to Interact comments, click here

  • I like by Jacquelyn’s comment a lot because it’s concise, to the point, and I could only hope to do that. She was actually responding specifically to one of the points that Dy made but specifically to him- acknowledging and validating his feelings. This part for some reason was reminiscent of criticisms of another race, and it made me understand how they must have felt because those things- crimes literally break my heart, and everyone is doing the best he or she can. Forget race, as a human being, mindful of what we know about psychology, teaching an infant who grow up a child to be kind and accommodating while everyone’s scared to death of him is quite the task: watching, following, condescending tones as if he can’t hear or perceive, sometimes failing to remember his age, consider that perhaps he’s sick, or any other human emotion. He must be perfect. Perfection is tossed out extra quickly when you look like an adult seemingly overnight– that’ll change your life. One day you’re Trey, and the next, you’re 6′ Mr. Martin. Ever ask a kid not to internalize or ask him to manage or control the emotions of around you? Oh he’d probably put his head down or put his hood up. Hiding– I can relate to that. Anyone could if they wanted to…
  • “Unfortunately, we have all been trained to not say these things in public especially on our FB pages because then we come off as always bringing up the “race card”. I don’t like gangs and senseless violence of ANY race.” – Jacquelyn Kuykendall (excerpt)

  • Dy’s passage is a stirring defense of the teen girl who testified on behalf of her friend Treyvon, in spite of the onslaught of painful racist and class-ist ridicule she endured in social media from all around. I didn’t know her before because I did not follow the trial, but after reading this, I am proud of her bravery because I know what it’s like to overcome a fear, and it is not easy for an adult. My quick little search  revealed what I would characterize as cyber-bullying. The gunman’s supporters attacked her deleted tweets to friends– not because she implicated guilt but for her perceived lack of education as judged by the articulation of her texts. This is important because as Dy says, English is not her first language, but most of us only know one language– broken, wrong, or not. She passionately calls on others to lift this young lady in support.  Dy discusses qualities that made this young lady  a target of ridicule within the racial community with passion- not ridicule but support, offer help, or say nothing about her .
  • This makes me appreciate being raised as a person and not as a color. Different types of people were always around- no mention because it didn’t matter. Every once in a while, I would encounter someone who didn’t know any better, but not often! In that sense, I knew who I wasn’t, and that “my place” was no different– not as a conscious thought, but just that it is. It’s easy to focus on what ya didn’t have, what  happened, or who I might’ve become if, but sometimes it’s good to be thankful for what didn’t happen and what I didn’t become. Because something you just don’t want to be.

Thank you for reading! We need some cheer honey!!

To return to Interact comments, click here

May as Well Tell You Now: A Poem.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s